The Moral Law of Music

Today, we're reminded of just how much music can do.

The digital world in which we live allows us to be many places at once. Through countless clickable visual imprints, we can see and share what it might look like to own things we can't afford, be people we emulate, and hide from those we despise or denigrate.

In this world, our needs can be quickly served and nearly all of our questions addressed with answers we prefer. Our every itch can be scratched and every ideation satisfied.

It's a me first world, whose biggest irony is that its architecture was created largely from the desire to share songs across distance. And yet nothing does as much for us as the act of sharing music with one another in person.

We're big Cab Calloway fans around here: we especially love his high speed rhyming, wordless scats, and soaring vocals. A fellow collector who knows about our admiration for the big band leader insisted we watch this clip. When we did, one of the best things we found was a big middle finger to society's  "me-me-me" mentality.

Formerly unresponsive nursing home resident and Cab Calloway fan, hearing music from his era.

Music is a moral law. It gives soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, and charm and gaiety to life and to everything.
– Plato

As important as music has always been to us, woven throughout our histories and tied to just about every human connection we make, we realize we haven't used music enough to actively help others. And by help, we mean giving people a way to communicate or, for example, as Jail Guitar Doors shows us, giving others the power to climb up and out.

Today, we realize we can do better.

Welcome to the Cosmic Vinyl blog.

We share music and hope for the best.

 

 

About

JOHN ESPINOSA NELSON

In 1981 a Nelson family friend, and Manager of Wolf & Rissmiller's Country Club offered a “comped,” “safe”  balcony seat for any show John cared to see at the venue. His parents reluctantly agreed. The Los Angeles band, X, was young Nelson’s first pick, and soon after, The Blasters, Oingo Boingo, 45 Grave and Agent Orange.
It all went downhill from there, but that's for another website. 
Check out his Fake News @defcon_john

 

John Espinosa Nelson

Hollywood CA

In 1980 a Nelson family friend, and manager of Wolf & Rissmiller's Country Club offered a “comped,” “safe”  balcony seat for any show John cared to see at the venue. His parents agreed. The Los Angeles band, X, was young Nelson’s first pick, and soon after, Oingo Boingo, then 45 Grave.
It all went downhill from there, but that's for another website. 

Say it to his face @defcon_john